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Introduction to family intervention tenancies

This content applies to England

Family intervention tenancies can be offered by local authorities and registered social landlords in circumstances of antisocial behaviour.

Family intervention tenancies are only intended as a means of working with families that have been involved in antisocial behaviour for a limited period. (For more information see the page on Requirements of a family intervention tenancy.)

What is a family intervention tenancy?

Family intervention tenancies were created as a means of working with families that have been involved in antisocial behaviour.

Family intervention tenancies can only be offered for the purposes of providing behavioural support services to tenants against whom a possession order:

  • has been made in relation to a secure/assured tenancy on the grounds of antisocial behaviour; or
  • could have been so made in relation to a secure/assured tenancy, or could have been so made if the tenant had had such a tenancy, on the grounds of antisocial behaviour.[1]

Family intervention tenancies do not provide any rights to succession nor offer tenants any long-term security. They can be terminated by the landlord following the correct procedure.

Behaviour support agreement

Family intervention tenancies can only be used for the purpose of providing behaviour support services that have been outlined in a written behaviour support agreement. This agreement will be between the tenant, the family intervention project, the social landlord providing the accommodation, and the local housing authority for the district in which the accommodation is to be provided (where different from the landlord).

The behaviour support agreement should outline:

  • the expected changes in the behaviour of the household
  • the behaviour support that will be provided
  • the sanctions that will apply if the agreement is not complied with.

For more information, please see also the section on Family intervention projects.

Legislation and guidance

Family intervention tenancies came into force on 1 January 2009 and were introduced by the Housing and Regeneration Act 2008.[2]

The Department for Communities and Local Government guidance for social landlords details what social landlords, family intervention projects and other agencies should consider when deciding to use family intervention tenancies.

The National Housing Federation has published a briefing for housing associations outlining the main issues in the CLG guidance.

[1] para 47A(3) Schedule 1 Housing Act 1985; para 12ZA (3) Schedule 1 Housing Act 1988, as inserted by s.297 Housing and Regeneration Act 2008.

[2] s.297 Housing and Regeneration Act 2008; Housing and Regeneration Act 2008 (Commencement No. 2 and Transitional, Saving and Transitory Provisions) Order 2008 SI 2008/3068.

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