Eviction of assured tenants

Most assured tenants can only be evicted in certain circumstances. Find out when landlords have the right to evict assured tenants and the procedures that must be followed.

Are you an assured tenant?

You are probably an assured tenant if:

  • you moved in before 1997 and did not receive a notice from your landlord saying you are an assured shorthold tenant
  • your landlord told you in writing before your tenancy started that you are an assured tenant
  • you were an assured tenancy with the same landlord immediately before your current tenancy started

Many private tenants are assured shorthold tenants.

Use Shelter's tenancy checker to check what type of tenancy you have.

Rights in an assured tenancy

The law provides private tenants with rights. These depend on the type of living arrangement you have, the date you moved in and the agreement you have with your landlord.

Assured tenants have strong tenancy rights. You can only be evicted if your landlord can prove a reason (or 'ground') to the court.

If the ground is proven, the court:

  • has no choice but to make a possession order (a 'mandatory ground'), or
  • only makes a possession order if it is reasonable to do so (a 'discretionary ground')

Get advice if you are not sure of your rights.

Use Shelter's directory to find a Shelter advice centre, Citizens Advice or other advice centre in your area.

Notice for assured tenants

Your landlord has to give you a written notice. It is often called a Section 8 notice.

The notice must be in a special form. 

The notice must include the ground on which your landlord is seeking possession. It must also state the earliest date that court action can start.

The notice has to be for a set length of time. It must let you know that after that time ends your landlord can apply to the court for a possession order. The length of time on the notice depends on the reason your landlord is evicting you. Usually this is either 14 days or two months.

When the reason for wanting to evict you is antisocial behaviour the notice takes effect after 14 days, 4 weeks, one month or even immediately. The actual period depends upon which ground is being used and whether you have a fixed term tenancy or not.

Notices remain valid for one year. This means that your landlord can start court action to evict you at any time until exactly 12 months after the date the notice was served on you. If court action is not started within this time your landlord has to serve a new notice.

Reasons for eviction of assured tenants

The reasons (or 'grounds') that landlords can use to evict assured tenants are in two groups. These are 'mandatory grounds' and 'discretionary grounds'.

Mandatory grounds

If your landlord is using a mandatory ground the court has no choice but to make a possession order if it is satisfied that the ground exists.

Examples of mandatory grounds include:

  • more than eight weeks rent arrears owing, or two months if you pay your rent monthly, at the time the notice was served and at the date of the court hearing
  • repossession by your landlord's mortgage lender (if prior notice of the possibility of this was given)
  • redevelopment of the property
  • antisocial behaviour, if the tenant (or a member of her/his household, or even a visitor in some cases) has already been convicted of antisocial behaviour in the courts

Discretionary grounds

If your landlord is using a discretionary ground for possession the court only makes a possession order if the ground is proven and it is reasonable to do so.

Examples of discretionary grounds include:

  • some rent arrears
  • persistent late payment of rent
  • breach of tenancy agreement
  • antisocial behaviour
  • damage to the property

Court orders for eviction of assured tenants

Once you have been given a correct notice and the notice period has ended your landlord can apply to the county court for a possession order.

The court sends you documents telling you about your landlord's eviction claim. You can send back information to help the court decide whether to make a possession order. You can also go to the court hearing.

If your landlord is using a mandatory ground and the court agrees that the ground is proven, the court has no choice but to make a possession order. It is possible to delay the possession order for up to six weeks, but only if you are suffering great hardship.

If your landlord is using a discretionary ground the court only makes a possession order if it is reasonable to do so. When the court looks at whether it is reasonable to make a possession order, it can consider your circumstances, such as your health and income.

Read more about the orders a court can make and if it's possible to get an order changed.

Illegal eviction of assured tenants

Your landlord is breaking the law if they try to evict you without getting a court order. There might be action you can take to stop your landlord from doing this.

The council might be able to help stop the illegal eviction.

Get advice if your landlord is trying to illegally evict you.

Use Shelter's directory to find a face-to-face advice centre in your area.

Fill out my online form.

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