Doing repairs yourself in council or housing association homes

If you are a council or housing association tenant and your landlord won't carry out repairs or is being unreasonably slow in doing them, you may decide to use some of your rent money to pay for repairs. To do this, you must follow the correct procedure.

It is important to remember that you don't have the right to withhold rent. If you don't pay your rent, your landlord might try to evict you.

Housing benefit claimants using rent money to pay for repairs

If you are a council tenant and you claim housing benefit to pay for your rent, you cannot withhold any of your rent money to pay for repairs. This is because your housing benefit is paid directly to the council you rent your home from.

Eviction due to withholding of rent

How easy it is for your landlord to evict you because you haven't paid all your rent depends on the type of tenancy you have. If you have limited rights and the repairs are not essential, it may be better to live with things as they are, and to get the repairs done in another way.

If you have an introductory tenancy or a demoted tenancy, you can be evicted much more easily than secure tenants. Similarly, if you rent from a housing association, you can be evicted much more easily if you have an assured shorthold tenancy instead of an assured or secure tenancy.

Whatever type of tenancy you have, it is essential to follow the correct procedure (see below).

Procedure for using rent money to pay for repairs

You must follow a specific procedure if you want to pay for repairs and take the cost out of your rent. Otherwise, your landlord can evict you. However, if you do follow the correct procedure, you will have a defence if the landlord starts possession proceedings against you.

Be sure to keep copies of all correspondence, and keep accurate records of what you have paid and when. Use and adapt our sample letters to write to your landlord.

Step 1 - report the repairs

If repairs are needed to your council or housing association home, you should report the repairs to the landlord and allow time for them to be done. You may be able to report repairs online, or you might prefer to do it in writing.

Use our Letter iconsample letter to tell your landlord about the repairs. Remember to keep a copy.

Step 2 - use your landlord's complaints procedure

If your landlord does not reply or does not begin repairs within a reasonable time, use your landlord’s formal complaints procedure to complain about the disrepair. Your tenants’ handbook will have details of the complaints procedure.

Step 3 - write again if repairs haven't been started

If your landlord does not get in touch with you or does not start the repairs, write to your landlord again – explain that you intend do the work yourself and take the costs out of your rent, unless the repairs are done within a certain time (eg two weeks).

Use our Letter iconsample letter telling your landlord you plan to do the repairs. Keep a copy.

Step 4 - get quotes for the repair work

Once two or three weeks has passed, get three quotes/estimates for the work from reliable contractors.

Step 5 - write to your landlord with the quotes

Send the quotes to your landlord with a letter explaining that you are going to go ahead with the cheapest quote unless your landlord arranges for the repairs to be done within a certain time (eg a further two weeks).

Use our Letter iconsample letter giving your landlord quotes for the repairs. Keep a copy.

Step 6 - arrange for repair work to be done

Once this time has passed, if your landlord hasn't responded, arrange for the work to be done by the contractor that gave the cheapest quote.

Step 7 - pay for work and send landlord receipt

Pay for the work yourself and send a copy of the receipt to your landlord, asking them to refund the money. See our Letter iconsample letter asking your landlord to pay for the repairs. Keep a copy.

Step 8 - if money is not refunded, deduct from rent

If your landlord does not give you back the money, write and confirm that you are going to deduct the money from your future rent. Explain exactly when the deductions will start and how long you will withhold rent for.

Use our Letter iconsample letter telling your landlord you will be deducting money from your rent. Don't forget to keep a copy.

Who is responsible for the quality of the work?

The tenant is responsible for the quality of the repair work. Make sure the repairs are carried out properly. If you carry out or arrange repairs that are done badly, you'll be legally responsible for putting right any damage caused.

Last updated: 1 January 2014