See if your tenancy deposit is protected

Find out if your tenancy deposit is protected

Your deposit is your money. Your landlord should protect your deposit in one of the schemes below within 30 days of receiving it. If not, you could be due compensation of 1 to 3 times the value of the deposit.

You automatically have an assured shorthold tenancy if:

  • you moved in on or after 28 February 1997 and
  • you pay rent to a private landlord and
  • you have control over your home so that your landlord and other people cannot come in whenever they want to and
  • your landlord does not live in the same building as you and
  • you are not living in university or college accommodation or business premises.

1 What you’ll need

Your postcode
Tenancy start date
Deposit amount

2 How to check your deposit is protected

Is your tenancy deposit protected? Check online to see if your deposit is protected in a government-backed tenancy deposit protection scheme.

This applies if you have an assured shorthold tenancy that was started or renewed after 6 April 2007.

If you do not have an assured shorthold tenancy you will have a different process.

3

No
My deposit
is not protected

Find out what to do

Yes
My deposit
is protected

Find out what to do

Good news! As you’ve found the scheme your deposit is registered with, your money should be secure until you move out.

If you keep up with the rent, and leave the place in good condition, your landlord should return your deposit at the end of your tenancy.

Find out more about deductions from tenancy deposits and how to get your deposit back at the end of your tenancy.

Sign our Rogue Landlords petition

The action you take will depend on whether your tenancy is current or if your tenancy has ended:

3. Ask your landlord if your deposit is protected

Your landlord has 30 days from receiving your deposit to tell you in writing which scheme has been used to protect your deposit.

If you have not heard from your landlord in this time, you can write to your landlord and ask for this information.

Use our sample letter to ask your landlord which tenancy deposit scheme is protecting your money

4. Ask your landlord to protect your deposit

If it has been 30 days or more since you paid you tenancy deposit to your landlord (or the landlord's agent), you could write to your landlord and ask for your deposit to be protected.

Use our sample letter to ask your landlord to protect your tenancy deposit.

NOTE: There may be risks involved in taking further action at this stage. You could take court action to recover your deposit with compensation at the end of your tenancy instead.

7. Share your story

If you've had trouble getting your deposit protected, we want to hear about it. Please share your story and help us fight for better rights for tenants.

Share your story

If your landlord should have protected your deposit but hasn't, the law says that you are entitled to have your tenancy deposit returned to you. A court can order your landlord to return your deposit and pay you compensation of between 1 and 3 times its value.

7. Share your story

If you've had trouble getting your deposit protected, we want to hear about it. Please share your story and help us fight for better rights for tenants.

Share your story

 

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