Assured tenancies with housing associations

Assured tenants have strong rights and can be evicted only in certain situations.

Are you an assured tenant?

You’re probably an assured tenant if your landlord is a housing association. It’s a life-long tenancy, which will end only if you leave or are evicted.

Exceptions

You won't be an assured tenant if:

  • you have a fixed-term assured shorthold tenancy, for example because you live in supported housing
  • you're a new tenant and have a starter tenancy
  • your tenancy has been demoted because of anti-social behaviour
  • your tenancy is secure because it started before 15 January 1989

Key features

Eviction

The housing association must get a court order if it wants to evict you. It has to prove you’ve broken the rules of your tenancy.

For example, if you have more than 2 months' rent arrears, a court would have to make a possession order.

Find out more about the eviction of assured tenants

Rent increases

The housing association usually has to give you 4 weeks’ notice in writing before increasing your rent.

From April 2016 housing associations were required to reduce the rent of most tenants by 1% each year until April 2020

Tenancy agreement

You should receive a written tenancy agreement from the housing association that explains your rights and responsibilities.

It will give information such as how much the rent is, when it must be paid and whether you have to pay service charges.

Some housing associations will also provide a tenant’s handbook containing additional information.

Your rights

You have the right to:

If you get permission from the housing association first you can:

Some assured tenants also have the right to acquire or the right to buy their home at a discount from the housing association.

Still need help?

Get advice if you need more help with an assured tenancy from a housing association.

Use Shelter's directory to find an advice service near you


Last updated 23 Oct 2017 | © Shelter

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