You're viewing a new version of this page. To opt out and view our old site, click the button.

How to get your tenancy deposit back

Steps to take if your landlord doesn't refund your tenancy deposit money when you leave.

1. Ask for your deposit back

A tenancy deposit is money you pay to a landlord in case you leave without paying your rent in full or damage something. It should be returned to you after you leave.

Your tenancy deposit should be refunded within 10 days if you are an assured shorthold tenant. Most private renters have this type of tenancy. If you are a lodger, your deposit should be returned within a reasonable amount of time.

Your first step is to ask your landlord to return your deposit or to ask their tenancy deposit scheme to return it if they hold your money.

Write to your landlord 

Your landlord is responsible for refunding your tenancy deposit to you. Their letting agent may return it to you if they manage the property for your landlord.

You can send a letter or email to your landlord or their letting agent to ask for it back.

Use Shelter's template letter to ask for your tenancy deposit back

You can use this template letter if you are a tenant or if you are a lodger living in your landlord's home.

Ask a tenancy deposit scheme to refund your deposit

You can ask a tenancy deposit protection scheme to refund your money if your landlord paid your deposit money into their custodial scheme. The refund process usually takes 5 to 10 days.

Use the tenancy deposit scheme's online refund process:

DPS

mydeposits

TDS

You or your landlord can ask the tenancy deposit protection scheme to refund:

  • your money in full 
  • part to you and the rest to your landlord if you both agree the amounts 

A tenancy deposit protection scheme can't refund your money if your landlord protected it using an insurance-based scheme. 

If you are not sure if your tenancy deposit was protected, you can check online.

Check if your tenancy deposit has been protected

2. Challenge deductions from your deposit

Your landlord should write to you to explain any deductions they've made from your deposit. You can write to ask for an explanation if they don't.

Examples of when your landlord can make reasonable deductions from your tenancy deposit include if you:

  • failed to pay your rent 
  • caused damage to the property
  • didn't leave the place clean 

Write to your landlord 

Use Shelter's template letter to challenge deductions from your deposit

You can use this letter if you are a tenant or if you are a lodger living in your landlord's home.

Use a tenancy deposit scheme's dispute resolution service

Your landlord should have used a tenancy deposit protection scheme to protect your tenancy deposit if you are an assured shorthold tenant.

The scheme's alternative dispute resolution (ADR) service can help if there's a dispute about the return of your tenancy deposit. You can only use ADR if both you and your landlord agree. The service is free.

The ADR service decides how much of your deposit should be returned to you.  Their decision is final. 

Contact the tenancy deposit protection scheme to find out more about their ADR service:

DPS

my deposits

TDS

A tenancy deposit protection scheme's ADR service can only deal with whether your tenancy deposit should be returned to you in full or in part. It can't award you compensation, but you can consider separate court action for this.

If you are not sure if your tenancy deposit was protected, you can check online.

Check if your tenancy deposit has been protected

3. Consider court action

You may be able to take court action if your landlord refuses to return all or part of your deposit. Court action should be a last resort. 

You can use a tenancy deposit protection scheme's alternative dispute resolution (ADR) service to resolve a dispute instead of going to court. You can only use this if you have an assured shorthold tenancy and your landlord used a tenancy deposit protection scheme to protect your deposit. There is no cost to you or your landlord. Their decision is final.

The first step in taking court action is to send your landlord a formal letter called a letter before action. This sets out the details of the case against your landlord, including any claim for compensation. It's worth sending a letter before action even if you don't like the idea of going to court. Your landlord may offer to settle the dispute rather than face a court hearing. 

Court action if your tenancy deposit was protected

You can take your landlord to court for a refund of your tenancy deposit if you are an assured shorthold tenant and your landlord:

  • protected your deposit with a tenancy deposit protection scheme
  • won't agree to use the scheme's ADR service

Find out how to take court action to get your tenancy deposit back

You can also claim compensation from your landlord if they:

  • protected your tenancy deposit late 
  • didn't provide you with the information required by the rules or provided it late

Under tenancy deposit protection rules, your landlord usually has 30 days from when you pay your deposit to protect it and give you certain information.

Find out how to claim tenancy deposit compensation

Court action if your tenancy deposit wasn't protected

If your landlord didn't protect your deposit in a tenancy deposit protection scheme within 30 days, you can take your landlord to court to claim:

  • a refund of your tenancy deposit
  • compensation of between 1 and 3 times the value of your tenancy deposit

This only applies if your tenancy was an assured shorthold tenancy.

Find out how to claim tenancy deposit compensation

Not sure if your deposit is protected?

Your landlord should have informed you which tenancy deposit protection scheme they've used to protect your money. 

Check if your tenancy deposit has been protected

Lodgers, student in halls and assured tenants

If you are not an assured shorthold tenant, you can take court action to get all or part of your deposit returned.

Follow the process for the return of a lodger's deposit if you are a lodger, student in halls or an assured tenant.

Find out how to take court action for the return of a lodger's deposit

4. Check if you are owed compensation

You may be able to take court action to claim compensation if you have an assured shorthold tenancy and your landlord broke tenancy deposit protection rules.

You can apply to a court to claim compensation from your landlord if they:

  • didn't protect your tenancy deposit or protected it late
  • didn't provide you with information about the scheme or provided it late

In most cases, tenancy deposit protection rules allow your landlord 30 days from when you pay your deposit to protect your deposit and give you information about the scheme used. Different time limits apply for tenancy deposits paid before 6 April 2012.

You can make a claim for compensation even if your landlord has already returned all or part of your tenancy deposit.

Find out more about how to claim tenancy deposit compensation

Last updated 30 Jun 2016 | © Shelter

How can we improve this advice?

Email a link to this article

Thank you - your message has been sent.

Sorry! - your message has not been sent this time.

Please contact #########

Leave Feedback

Thank you - your feedback has been submitted to the team.

Sorry! - your message has not been sent this time.

Please contact #########