Policy library

Policy, research and good practice work forms a major part of Shelter's efforts to address and find solutions for homelessness and housing issues. In this section you can browse through the reports, factsheets, briefings and policy consultation responses that we produce.

All policy documents

Response - DWP: 21st Century Welfare

Applicable to: England
Published:  October 2010

Shelter does support many of the principles underlying this reform agenda, specifically attempts to simplify the benefits system to create a more personalised, responsive scheme, and to reduce the barriers to working that are experienced by the minority of unemployed HB claimants. If a system of Universal Credits were able to combine these, while maintaining the distinct important features of HB, we would support it. Read summary and download 

Briefing: The Comprehensive Spending Review

Applicable to: England
Published:  October 2010

Housing has been the biggest loser in the Comprehensive Spending Review (CSR). Read summary and download 

Policy briefing: Housing advice

Applicable to: England
Published:  September 2010

Shelter estimates that over 1.2m adults have problems with their rented housing and over half a million have a problem with homelessness. The housing system can be difficult to navigate alone. Most people with a housing problem will need some sort of information or advice. However, those most likely to have a problem are often the least able to pay for it. Publicly funded advice ensures that the poorest and most vulnerable can obtain advice on housing matters. Read summary and download 

Response: Proposals arising from a cost review of the English Housing Survey

Applicable to: England
Published:  September 2010

The English Housing Survey (EHS) is a major survey undertaken annually by CLG. Proposals have been made for reducing the cost of this survey, including reducing the sample size. Read summary and download 

Campaigns briefing - Tackling rogue landlords

Applicable to: England
Published:  September 2010

Most private landlords are responsible and honest in how they deal with their tenants and look after their properties. But a minority of landlords are exploitative or even threatening in their treatment of tenants, including wilfully putting tenants at risk by refusing to do essential repairs and maintenance. Read summary and download 

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