What to do about poor quality or unfinished repairs

Complain to your landlord if repairs are done badly, or if damage is caused to your home.

Report problems to your landlord immediately

When carrying out work on your home, your landlord has a responsibility to:

  • make sure work is done to a reasonable standard
  • avoid causing damage

Contact your landlord immediately about poor quality repairs or damage to your home. 

Write to them and include as much detail as possible in your letter or email. Explain the problem and how it inconveniences you.

Take photos of the poor repairs or damage to send to your landlord.

You can:

  • suggest times and dates for the work to fix the problems
  • remind your landlord that they must complete repairs to a good standard

If your landlord refuses to fix bad repairs or damage

You can take steps to make sure your landlord fixes the problems.

Steps you can take include:

  • asking your council’s environmental health department to tell your landlord to fix the repairs or damage
  • taking your landlord to court

You need to give your landlord reasonable opportunity to deal with the damage or unfinished repairs first.

Checks on repairs companies

Ask your landlord for details of the company or tradespeople that they plan to use to deal with unfinished or poor quality repairs. 

You can check their repairs histories and ask your landlord to consider another company if there are issues. 

Ongoing inconvenience during repairs

You may be able to claim compensation from your landlord if repairs work causes problems such as:

  • excessive and ongoing noise
  • disruption to your daily life and enjoyment of your home
  • health risks for example from dust and chemicals

You may also be able to ask for compensation if your gas and electricity are cut off for a long time during repairs.

Don’t stop paying your rent during repairs

You still need to keep paying your rent, even when there are problems with repairs. 

You can try and negotiate a reduction in your rent if there has been disruption. For example, if you can’t use some rooms in your home.


Last updated 05 Aug 2019 | © Shelter

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