Possession of PRPSH special needs housing

Possession rules for special needs housing are the same as for general-needs housing, but there are certain cases that have particular relevance.

This content applies to England

Secure tenancies

A secure tenancy may be terminated and possession obtained in certain cases, the following of which have particular relevance to special-needs housing:

  • the property has features that are designed for use by a person with a physical disability and there is no longer a person needing those features living in the property[1]

  • the landlord is a PRPSH that lets properties to tenants who have particular housing needs and there is no longer a person with such needs living in the property[2]

  • the property is used for persons with special needs and is situated near to services or facilities used by those persons, and there is no longer a person with such needs living in the property.[3]

In all cases, reliance on the ground is only possible where suitable alternative accommodation is available and the court considers it reasonable to order possession.

Assured tenancies

There are no equivalent grounds for assured tenancies, but the court may order possession where suitable alternative accommodation is available and the court considers it reasonable to order possession.[4]

Last updated: 21 January 2021

Footnotes

  • [1]

    Sch.2, ground 13 Housing Act 1985.

  • [2]

    Sch.2, ground 14 Housing Act 1985.

  • [3]

    Sch.2, ground 15 Housing Act 1985.

  • [4]

    Sch.2, ground 9 Housing Act 1988.